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Monthly Archives: April 2015

Businesses relying on software, I’m here to tell you that I charge the developer.

I charge the developer with being the biggest liar on this earth.

I charge the developer with being the biggest imposter on this earth.

I charge the developer with being the biggest neglector on this earth.

There is no place in this world where that man can go where he has delivered solutions.

Everywhere he has gone, he has created havoc!

Everywhere he has gone, he has created debt!

So I charge the developer.

I charge the developer with being the biggest slacker on this earth.

I charge the developer with being the biggest robber and enslaver on this earth.

I charge the developer with being the most unprofessional on this earth.

How is it possible that the developer can write software to automate manual processing, but refuses to write the code necessary to ensure the quality of their own work?

Therefore, I charge the developer with gross negligence.

He cannot deny the charges. You cannot deny the charges. Our return on investment are living proof of those charges!

You and I have proof!

You don’t have developers. You’re the victim of developers!

He didn’t tell you the side-effects of what would happen if you’d hire him.

He didn’t say that if you hired him that he would use your time and money to make mistakes.

He didn’t tell you that he doesn’t practice new ideas on his own time.

No! He practiced the latest buzz-words and media hype on your time!

Thus, he practiced and failed miserably with your money!

Hiring developers has not solved your business problems.

You’re not a developer. I’m not a developer.

You’re one of a million businesses that are victims of the developer!

We haven’t seen the developer bring to life our business’s dream.

But we’ve experienced the developer’s touch of death, just to deliver our business’s nightmare.

NOTE:

Scott Nimrod is fascinated with Software Craftsmanship.

He loves responding to feedback and encourages people to share his articles.

He can be reached at scott.nimrod @ bizmonger.net

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Designing Victory based on Known Threats

I was once addicted to a RTS game called Halo Wars. This game was the first RTS game I had ever played and it was for the console (Xbox 360). The objective of the game was to deprive your enemy of their bases and / or military units such as infantry, air, etc. Thus, within the first 20 seconds of a game, I had already developed a strategy for either attacking the enemy base or countering their expected invasion. In order to develop a strategy within the first twenty seconds of a game, I would first have to execute a default strategy that would be easy to cancel and replace while at the same time performing reconnaissance on the enemy. Performing reconnaissance was absolutely vital for preparing to invade or countering an eminent attack. Just from observing the enemy’s environment, I could make the decision to execute the “Rush” strategy and invade before the enemy had setup their defenses or I could leverage the “Turtle” strategy and build-up my defenses so that I could counter their attack and then invade their territory with limited resistance.

After playing the game for a while, I noticed a pattern for most of the games that I had won:

  • Destroy the enemy before they can get started. While building my infrastructure I would send a small force to disrupt any activities that the enemy had brewing. This forced the enemy to play on my terms. Thus, I set the pace of the game.
  • Investing in infrastructure in response to enemy activity was absolutely paramount. It’s foolish to fight a war without understanding your enemy’s capabilities.
  • Continuing to update infrastructure in response to enemy activity continued to be paramount. I continued updating my infrastructure and military units each time I identified a change in the enemy’s eco-system.
  • If the previous patterns were established, then conquering enemy bases became easy. I had answers for each situation they put me in because I designed my infrastructure based on their threats

What does this have to do with Software?

Building software is also a game of planning and execution. The illustrations described also serve as patterns for building great software. The main point though is that in order to build software effectively, one must be strategic when building software infrastructure and execute software development strategies with ruthless intent.

• Employees serve their company
• Contractors serve their industry

• Employees depend on their employers for growth
• Contractors depend on themselves for growth

• Employees are products of their company
• Contractors are products of their industry

• Employees are compensated based on the compassion of HR
• Contractors are compensated based on what they have demonstrated regardless of external processes

NOTE:

Scott Nimrod is fascinated with Software Craftsmanship.

He loves responding to feedback and encourages people to share his articles.

He can be reached at scott.nimrod @ bizmonger.net

What Drives Performance? (Culture or Process)
The short answer is culture. Regardless of any process that the late Spartans had within their civilization, their culture demanded grit and tenacity. From that core value that that particular state operated on, their process of building fierce warriors and their resulting performance on the battle field dismantled threats more effectively in comparison to their neighboring states.

Process should be snapped onto culture versus being stuck onto it. Hence, there must be a mechanism that supports extensibility over polarity.
In conclusion, the culture must first be assembled for the process before it can be expected to adapt to it.Spartans