How I got on the most popular software development podcast

podcast[1]

Intro

A couple of years ago, after listening to an episode on Dot Net Rocks, I made a promise to myself:

“Instead of listening to other guests on this podcast, one day I’m going to be listening to myself.”

I fulfilled this prophesy on October 7th. I recorded a show with Richard Campbell and Carl Franklin. The show was centered on Software Craftsmanship.

This is what I did to get on their show:

  • Developed an expertise on specific areas of software development
  • Routinely commented on Dot Net Rocks and other software development websites (blogs, podcasts, etc.).
  • Created a technical blog
  • Reached out to Dot Net Rocks

Areas of Expertise

I knew that in order to be a guest on any podcast program, I would have to be an expert at something related to software development. As a result, I decided that I would to convey expertise in XAML, Test Automation, and Software Craftsmanship, In addition, I would try to answer at least one question on StackOverflow.com every day until I reached 1000 points. Whenever I would solve a really tough problem, I would immediately search stackoverflow.com to see if there were any posted questions to the problem I just solved. I would then post my solution to every question I could find on the site.

Sharing my Thoughts

I knew that in order to be perceived as a thought leader, I would have to take massive and consistent action in proliferating my thoughts to the software development community. As a result, I deposited my ideas everywhere I could find a medium to host them. That included stackoverflow.com, DotNetRocks.com, HanselMinutes.com, SimpleProgrammer.com, LinkedIn.com, local user groups, my own technical blog, etc. Thus, I didn’t just post comments. Comments are typically short and limited. Instead I would post essays on people’s sites. Sometimes, I would copy and paste an entire article that I wrote for my blog and post it as a comment to someone else’s blog or podcast. I just didn’t care. If my content was related to a topic then I considered myself killing multiple birds with one stone.

Maintaining a Technical Blog

As I mentioned earlier, I maintained a technical blog. I viewed having a technical blog as my own personal repository for my solutions to technical problems as well as it being a depot for my philosophical thoughts on software development. I would then copy and paste my articles from my technical blog to LinkedIn.com in order to create an additional channel for discovery.

Reaching Out

After creating a professional web footprint that I could be proud of, I decided that it was time for me to reach out to DotNetRocks. After all, all they could do is just ignore my email. So I simply emailed the hosts of the show and asked if I could be prescreened for a show regarding software development practices. They soon responded to my email with a date to do the show. I couldn’t believe it. What took about two years of preparation only took a couple of days to setup. As a result, the show I recorded with them will be posted on November 5th 2015.

Conclusion

In conclusion, a couple of years ago, after listening to an episode on Dot Net Rocks, I made a promise to myself:

“Instead of listening to other guests on this podcast, one day I’m going to be listening to myself.”

I fulfilled this prophesy on October 7th. I recorded a show with Richard Campbell and Carl Franklin. The show was centered on Software Craftsmanship. It will air November 5th 2015.

NOTE:

Scott Nimrod is fascinated with Software Craftsmanship.

He loves responding to feedback and encourages people to share his articles.

He can be reached at scott.nimrod @ bizmonger.net

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2 comments
  1. Hey Scott,
    I really enjoyed the show! I’m embarrassed to say that I still haven’t learned how to unit test but you’ve inspired me to take that on. I really identified with what you said about a shop holding you back from servicing your industry/career. I spent the first 8 years at a shop that embraced whatever the opposite of “bleeding edge” is. I didn’t even realize the damage I was doing to my career and I’ve been working to correct that the last couple years. Just seems like there is so much to catch up on though! (I hope some day to be more than a professional debugger! lol)

  2. Hey Ghodges,

    I sincerely believe that it’s a Developer’s Market.

    I once heard that the best movie stars reject roles that they believe will lower their value.
    Hence, the best movie stars just don’t participate in low-budget movies. They operate at a higher standard because their image (aka: brand) is on the line. The end result is lower pay and bad reviews based on their environment that they chose.
    Also, super stars only want to team up or play against other super stars. If they continue to work with lower skilled personnel then they risk losing their competitive edge.

    Consider this…
    Perhaps you can seek comfort in recognizing that for every end is a new beginning.

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